Currently viewing the tag: "Title IX"

In 1953, Ernest Nemeth, a football player at the University of Denver, sought workers’ compensation after suffering a back injury while playing football. In a 6-1 decision, the Colorado Supreme Court held that Nemeth was “employed” by the university to play football and was therefore entitled to weekly payments of $11.87 under [...]

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A federal judge has weighed in on a debate that runs rampant through the halls of many high schools:Is cheerleading a sport? The question presented itself when the Quinnipac University‘s women’s volleyball team sued the school for an alleged violation of Title IX. The university had recently announced it was eliminating the volleyball [...]

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Since 1979, the U.S. Department of Education has utilized a three-pronged test to determine whether collegiate athletic programs are in compliance with Title IX. This test mandates (1) athletic opportunities at the intercollegiate level provided in numbers substantially proportionate to student enrollment; or (2) a “continuing practice of program expansion” that is [...]

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Title IX, originally conceived to protect women from gender discrimination, has had the unfortunate and unintended effect of significantly reducing opportunities for male athletes to compete in their sports at the collegiate level. The various Department of Education opinion letters interpreting Title IX and its regulations provide three routes by which universities can [...]

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The U.S. Medal Count and Title IX

On September 26, 2008 By JETLaw

The recent Olympic Games in Beijing brought renewed national attention to an issue that is constantly on the minds of many in the athletic community: the impact that Title IX has had- and continues to have–on men’s collegiate athletics. For certain men’s sports, the correlation between Title IX and the elimination of college teams is [...]

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