Currently viewing the tag: "user-generated content"

Ending Revenge Porn Through Copyright

On April 3, 2014 By Philip Houten

The growth of interactive internet sites over the past couple decades has lead to the blossoming of an industry specializing in user-generated pornography. This phenomenon has become known as “Porn 2.0,” and has provided users an outlet to post photos and videos not only of themselves, but also of people who have [...]

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Imagine the following scenario: A group of students harasses another student who is autistic. The group videotapes its bullying behavior of the student. Someone decides to upload the video to the Internet. After receiving complaints, the website hosting the video immediately removes it. Has a crime been committed?

While most may agree that the actions [...]

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The Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology Law is pleased to present three more abstracts from its most recent issue, which was released in May of 2009. The first three abstracts can be found here. Below are the summaries for Patenting Games: Baker v. Selden Revisited, by Shubha Ghosh; Law and the Emotive Avatar, [...]

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The Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology Law recently released its latest issue containing 11 articles on virtual worlds and user-generated content. Below are the abstracts from three of those articles: A First Amendment of Second Life: What Virtual Worlds Mean for the Law of Video Games, by Marc Jonathan Blitz; The Magic [...]

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Warner Music and YouTube Make New Deal

On October 2, 2009 By JETLaw

Back in December 2008, Warner Music Group pulled its music from YouTube when the two parties could not reach agreement on a new licensing arrangement. The agreements between YouTube and the major record labels apply to official and unofficial videos, so that move affected regular users who uploaded videos containing Warner [...]

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